About captainfreemaninn

Cape Cod Bed and Breakfast Innkeeper.

Brewster in Bloom at the Freeman

Captain Freeman Inn

Captain Freeman Inn

by Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

We  love our inn for many reasons but the one that stands out over and over is that we are so blessed to live in our wonderful small town of Brewster. It is a small community that is on the quiet side of the Cape and the town captures what many of us remember as “old time America” .

Brewster in Bloom is a town celebration that captures that feeling and includes a band concert at a local church, craft fairs and hopefully tons of daffodils in bloom. This years the daffodils coincided perfectly with the celebration. Our favorite part is the parade which runs down main street right in front of the Freeman. We love to sit in our rockers and watch the parade go by.

Rocking  at the Freeman

Rocking at the Freeman

Some of our favorite pics from the parade:

Family School float

Family School float

Brewster in Bloom parade cycling

Brewster in Bloom parade cycling

The loud part of the parade

The loud part of the parade

great music

great music

great fun

great fun

Clam water from the library:)

Clam water from the library:)

parents joining in on the fun

parents joining in on the fun

Exhaling on Cape Cod and happy spring to everyone.

New Cooking School Calendar at the Captain Freeman Inn

by Donna Cain

Cooking School at the Freeman

Cooking School at the Freeman

We have a fabulous time each winter during our Cape Cod Culinary cooking schools at the Captain Freeman Inn. Chef Carol will continue conducting the class. This year’s calendar is filled with some new comfort foods including bread and soups, all from the areas that we love in Europe including Italy, Spain and France.

The cooking school package includes a one or two night stay at either the Captain Freeman Inn or our sister property Brewster by the Sea Inn and Spa. The package includes a fabulous breakfast each day, cooking school for two and wine tasting and dinner afterwards. We pair both red and white wines to compliment our evening meal. Guests can sample different wines and decide which one they would like to enjoy with their meal. The dinner always concludes with a wonderful dessert or biscotti that I love to dunk in the dessert wine:)

Savory breakfast the the Freeman

Savory breakfast the the Freeman

2014/2015 Schedule

November 8, 2014- France

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In Paris the crisp fall air is filled with smells of baking bread and simmering comfort food. The flavors are amazing but the best part is that these classic dishes are simple and fun to make. We will make French bread, classic French Onion soup and French garlic sausage and butternut bisque that will transport you to Paris.

mushrooms from a previous class

mushrooms from a previous class

January 17, 2015 – Northern Italy

Winter chills mean fragrant country loaves and simmering soups overflowing with the bounty of the Tuscan hills. We will make country bread, stracchiatella, chicken and egg soup and hearty white bean and kale soup. Flavors to delight an Italian palate.

February 7,2015- Spain

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Winter is the season for warm bread dipped in fragrant olive oil and simple but beautiful paella, the comfort food of Spain. This hearty and simple rice sauté traditionally loaded with seafood and poultry. We will honor our local seafood bounty and prepare a sausage and scallop delight with all of the seasonings of Espagna!

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February 21, 2015- France/Provence

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As the cold mistral winds blow across the lavender fields of Provence, learn to shape French loaves in many shapes and sizes and enjoy classic Bouillabaisse, the provencal city of Marseille’s world famous seafood soup made with our local bounty of fish and seafood.

March 7, 2015- Southern Italy/Sicily

As spring approaches the hills of Sicily we will make hearty Sicilan country bread and two wonderful soups: Ribolitta (literally bread soup)and escarole soup with veal meatballs.

April 11, 2015- Spain, Portugal and Morocco

Where northern Africa meets southern Europe the flavors of Spain, Portugal and Morocco are all influenced by their common geography and unique histories. We will make traditional flat bread with its soft pillowy texture and amazing flavors. To accompany our bread, a selection of delicate soups and hearty tagine highlighting the local flavors of the region.

Our winter classes fill up quickly so it’s important to get your reservations in early. The package price includes best available room at time of booking giving you even more reason to book early so that you can reserve your favorite room.
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Bon Appetite and Exhaling on Cape Cod!

Brewster conservation

by Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

For us, conservation is a lifestyle. For example, we strive to do the right things in being green at the inn, using farm to table practices and reusing things whenever possible. This philosophy took on a new twist when we lost part of a beautiful Norwegian Maple in the back of the Captain Freeman. This tree is probably about 125 years old, based on it’s size and countable rings. When we purchased the Captain Freeman our new neighbors came over to introduce themselves and laughed when they said they had adopted our tree, as the inn had been vacant for several years. The grass on the rest of our property was several feet high, but our gracious neighbors had mowed the grass around the tree and had set a bench at the base. It really was a lovely thought as their grandchildren came to visit in the summer, and they all gathered around  this tree to let the kids play in a small  pool. Since then we have lovingly restored the grounds around the inn and have also enjoyed it’s shade and respite in the summer months. This past winter we had several North Easters that brought down two large limbs of the tree.

Side lawn at the Captain Freeman

Side lawn at the Captain Freeman

We were saddened as it was evident that the tree was diseased and would probably have to be totally removed in the next few years. My husband Byron cut up some of the branches and again our neighbor came and asked if we would mind if a friend took some of the wood as he was a craftsman that made lovely bowls. We were glad to share and know that the wood was put to some good use.

This morning as we were finishing up breakfast and had a surprise visit from Craig McConchie. Criag is a talented artist who specializes in wood and glass. He brought us a beautiful round bowl made from our tree:)

Wood bowl by Craig McConchie

Wood bowl by Craig McConchie

Byron and I were both so tickled when we looked at this web site, Tobias Wood and Glass and saw all of his beautiful pieces.Some of Craig’s other pieces that can be purchased on Etsy include:

Wood bowls

Wood bowls

Stained glass

Stained glass

Stained glass

Stained glass

We had a great conversation with Craig and were delighted to learn that his grandparents use to own “High Brewster” We had heard many stories from our guests about this restaurant and inn that was renowned for their great home style meals.

High Brewster Homested

High Brewster Homested

High Brewster was built in 1738 by the Winslow family on the north edge of Lower Mill Pond. It was run as an inn for most of the past century. The Thorne family bought it in 2001 and have been restoring it ever since.

I was also excited to learn that Craig raises chickens (I have wanted to get a chicken coop for year) and honey and would be able to provide us with some fresh eggs and honey for our breakfasts at the Captain Freeman Inn.

So all in all a great day! So much fun to have a beautiful bowl to remember our beautiful tree. We are talking about what species we will replace it with ….. thinking about a Tupelo or Swamp Oak Tree.

Spring has sprung at the Captain Freeman Inn on Cape Cod

By Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

Spring has always been my favorite season and a little sad this year as my dear mother passed away in January. She too, loved spring, and we would always walk the gardens together and comment about all the flowers that were pocking their heads up to the sky. This morning I was preparing breakfast for our guests staying at the Captain Freeman Inn, and I happened to look out the window at our raspberry patch. Sitting on top of two of the posts are homemade birdhouses made many years ago by my Uncle Al. This past fall I had our handy man Antonio repair and repaint them and we just hung them last week in our raspberry patch. To my surprise I saw a chickadee making a new nest in this house……so sweet…… my mind thought back to so many wonderful memories when I was a little girl.  I was very close to my Uncle Al who was the brother of my father. He was very handy with woodworking and also had many beautiful flowers growing in his greenhouse. I think he would be pleased that we placed his houses in our beautiful raspberry patch.

Bird house

Bird house

We started our raspberry patch at Brewster by the Sea from small plants from my Mom’s garden in the Berkshires. These particular plants are so hearty and provide us with two crops- one in July, and if the weather cooperated, one in the late fall.  Hoping we will get some nice berries this year to make our famous raspberry jam.

Raspberries

Raspberries

I am always amazed in the spring how you will be driving down the road one day and the trees will be bare and the next day everything will be green…..happening overnight! I am encouraged as these buds are almost ready!

New buds

New buds

I love fountains and am especially attached to this one as it use to be in my mom’s garden back in the Berkshires. We have placed this one near our porch where our guests enjoy breakfast overlooking the pool and gardens. Fountains make such a soothing sound….perfect for relaxing our guests.

Fountain

Fountain

This was my mother’s favorite peony. When she moved in with us at Brewster by the Sea ten years ago we transplanted it from her gardens back in the Berkshires. Last year we retransplanted it to the gardens at the Captain Freeman. So glad to see that it is healthy this spring.

Favorite peony

Favorite peony

Brewster in Bloom festivities start this upcoming weekend and I was so tickled to see the daffodils are all in bloom. These particular blooms grace our beautiful gardens around the pool.

Daffodils

Daffodils

Not quite sure which flower this is but the brilliant lavender color is a joy to see from inside the inn. I keep telling myself…..summer really is coming:)

Spring color

Spring color

Last but not least is a picture of our pool at the Captain Freeman, a boutique inn on Cape Cod. it was just opened last week, and the water is a little cold but once we get a few warm days it warms up quickly. Here is to a wonderful summer filled with laughter, sunshine and fun for all.

Captain freeman pool

Captain freeman pool

Herring run in Brewster

by Donna Cain, Innkeper and owner

We always know when spring is here as we hear all of the seagulls “squaking” with content at the Stoney Brook Grist Mill which is just behind our second inn, Brewster by the Sea Inn and Spa. It’s quite a sight to see the seagulls swooping down and eating many of the herring that are jumping upstream to reach Upper Mill pond where they will spawn over the summer months.

Herring Run

Herring Run.

It was interesting to read that the herring population is very healthy and increasing every year. The article below was written last year by the “Wicked Local” There is much debate as to why the population is increasing. When we first moved here over 10 years ago it was fun to watch the kids catching the herring in their nets. When the population starting decreasing you could not get a permit to catch the herring.

Herring at Stony Brook

2007 – 22,300
2008 – 25,289

2009 – 11,062

2010 – 48,099

2011 – 37,091

2012 – 41,028

2013 – 153,262

(one wonders how they can count the actual number of herring:)

Herring in Brewster

Herring in Brewster

They won’t be packing barrels of smoked herring out of the Stony Brook Mill site like they used to 100 years ago, but maybe some day folks will be able to dip their nets in to catch the sparkling silver fish once more for their private smoking.

The Association to Preserve Cape Cod reports last spring’s estimated record run of herring was 153,262 fish.

“It’s certainly encouraging to see this big increase at Stony Brook,” said noted Jo Ann Muramoto, senior scientist at the Association to Preserve Cape Cod, who oversees their work with herring. “Still it’s so, so low compared to historic records based on the barrels of fish they used to take out. I don’t think we’re out of the woods yet.”

Prior to 1903 Brewster had an official herring catcher who had to supply each town family with one eighth of barrel of herring a year. The average annual catch was 225 barrels. In contrast, in 1912, Harwich’s Herring River produced 1,200 barrels.

The official “record” only covers eight years, the formal herring counts began in 2007 but it still a good sign. The previous high was 48,099 in 2010 so this represents a tripling.

The question is, is the bounce due to the reworked (in fall 2010) culvert under Route 6A, which is now 18-feet wide instead of 4 feet, or does it reflect a general rebound of herring around the state?

“I’d like to think it’s a combination of both of those,” Muramoto said. “I do think making the culvert wider has made a difference. During the run itself a number of people including myself stood over the culvert and looked down at thousands of herring schooling to pass through the culvert whereas before maybe a dozen could move up at one time. An entire school could make it through now.”

Muramoto explained that herring seem to like to form a school before they move upstream.

“It’s probably the way they migrate upstream. If you watch at different points they seem to like to congregate in schools. This schooling pattern is pretty common,” she said.

Herring

Herring

That could be a way to reduce the chance of predation by gulls or other animals.

Massachusetts imposed a three-year moratorium on herring harvests (both alewife and blueback herring, both in the genus Alosa) on Jan. 1, 2006. That was extended for another three years in 2008 and has continued since. Connecticut and Rhode Island have also closed their herring fisheries however herring can be caught in the open ocean as a bycatch of other fisheries, especially Atlantic herring (Clupea Harengas). Most of the bycatch occurs around Cape Cod, according to a 2008 study.

“The effects of fishing at sea are not well controlled,” Muramoto observed.

Dana Condit, head of Brewster Mill Site Committee, puts more stock in the fishery shutdown than the new culvert.

“I grew up right there and I remember in the ’60’s they’d show up like this year and they would use that culvert,” Condit said. “In 1968 they changed the configuration where the fish go into the pond and they navigated that in huge numbers.”

The Stony Brook fishery was big business in those days.

“They used to sieve them out in the back of dump trucks and in barrels on tailor trucks. They took a lot of herring out of there,” Condit recalled.

Last year (2012) saw big runs of herring in the Charles and Black rivers, as well as at Stony Brook and in the Monument River in Bourne.

“This may have begun in 2012 and is continuing this year. We’ll know better when the Division of Marine Fisheries presents the results from around the state later this month,” Muramoto said. “I think 32 runs are monitored in Massachusetts. The highest numbers are on Cape Cod.”

Muramoto works with herring monitors in several towns.

“There are increases in some, others are the same,” she said. “The Herring River in Wellfleet almost doubled this year. Pilgrim Lake (in Orleans) was the same. The Mashpee River was the same but some counts were lost. The Quashnet (River) was the same. The increase for Stony Brook was one of the most dramatic.”

“I talked with construction guys from the DMF and they had wonderful numbers everywhere. It wasn’t just us,” Condit said. “A lot of runs did very well off Cape.”

The herring run generally peaks in late April and early May. Muramoto recruits 15 to 20 volunteers to do the counts. Nine counts are done each day at random times during herring season, at a designated location, each count lasts 10 minutes. Herring runs in Bournedale and Sandwich have electronic counters.

The herring do run at night, but nighttime counts have been problematic.

“We’ve tried to use a video camera underwater at night but had severe lighting problems,” Muramoto said. “We weren’t successful seeing fish.”

We stopped by the Herring run last night and Byron was able to get some great shots of the herring in the water. The pictures have an impressionistic feel and we both loved the shots so much that we want to frame some.

Herring in Brewster

Herring in Brewster

This particular evening the seagulls were flying overhead but were not swooping down for dinner…..maybe they had their fill for the day.

Herring

Herring

Many of our guests staying at the Captain Freeman Inn and Brewster by the Sea love visiting the Brewster Grist Mill. This weekend the town is celebrating Brewster in Bloom and the mill will be open for tours. They will also be selling their wonderful ground corn meal. We love to purchase the ground corn for our wonderful Captain Freeman Corn Muffins which we serve regularly at the inn.

Happy Spring!

Breakfast Chef at the Freeman

by Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

Happy to report that our wonderful breakfast chef Nick is returning to the Captain Freeman for our summer season. Nick has a wealth of experience and not only brings great culinary talent for our guests but also is a sweet guy to boot !

Nick with his beautiful daughter Lilly

Nick with his beautiful daughter Lilly

Nick is  the world’s best Dad to Lilly. I just love when they stop in to visit. Shown in this picture with her Dad, just before her 2nd birthday.

We have created some wonderful new breakfast entrees for the summer season including a delicious home fry with sweet potatoes, turkey and peppers….what a wonderful way to start your day on Cape Cod!

Captain Freeman’s cookbook coming to Cape Cod

by Donna Cain, Innkeeper and owner

Captain Freeman Inn in Brewster

Captain Freeman Inn in Brewster

We had fun with the title as everyone thinks it’s Captain Freeman answering the phone when they call to make a reservation…..so maybe he made the cookbook???? No, not really!

We are happy  to report that our new Captain Freeman cookbook is being printed now and should be to us by the end of the month. It is a project two years in the making as we have been creating many new recipes for the inn over the past few years. This cookbook includes many of our favorites.

Cover for our new cookbook

Cover for our new cookbook

Many of our guests ask us for our recipes, and we are always willing to share. Shown below is a new favorite for Black Bean and White Turkey Chile that our friend and Captain Freeman cooking school chef made for us. It was so good that I immediately asked Carol for the recipe and have passed it on to all of our family and friends. How appropriate to add to this blog for many more to enjoy. Thanks Carol!

The original recipe called for onions and Carol adapted the recipe to omit the onions as my husband is allergic. This recipe is easy to make, freezes well and will add a smile to everyone’s face that you include in this meal.

Black and White Bean Turkey Chili

4 Turkey thighs
3 cups chicken stock
3 cups beef stock
1 bay leaf
2 cloves of garlic, whole

2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 14 1/2 ounce can diced fire roasted tomatoes
1 small can mild green chiles, drained and chopped
4 cloves garlic, diced
1 can black beans, drained
1 can white beans, drained
2 Tablespoons flour
1/4 cup tequila
2 Tablespoons honey
1 Tablespoon salt
2 Tablespoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons Mexican chile powder
1 Tablespoon expresso powder

Place the turkey thighs in a large dutch oven with a bay leaf, garlic and stock just to cover. If you need a little more liquid add water. Bring to a boil and lower heat to a simmer and poach for one hour. Leave in the stock to cool just until you can easily handle the thighs. Remove thighs and reserve the stock in a separate container. Take the turkey off the bones and cut into bite size peaces.
In the same pot add the olive oil and heat. Then add the tomatoes and cook on high until the liquid is evaporated. Reduce the heat and add the chiles, garlic, turkey and beans. In a small bowl mix the flour, tequila, honey and all the additional spices until smooth. Add some reserved stock to create a smooth liquid. Add the liquid to the pot and stir and cook on medium heat until the chile begins to thicken. Add liquid if needed to create the desired thickness. Simmer for 30 minutes (some of the liquid will evaporate) Make ahead and refrigerate for up to 5 days. It just gets better! May be frozen for up to 90 days in meal size portions.

Bon Appetite!

Cape Cod Boutique Inn is inspired by nature

by Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

Beach shells

Beach shells

One of our favorite things in life is walking on our Cape Cod beaches.

walking the beach with Harrison

walking the beach with Harrison

This past week we found some beautiful shells that spoke to me. I am fascinated with color and am always looking for new color schemes and decor to use at the inn. We are a “boutique inn on Cape Cod” as each room is tastefully decorated in a unique theme. Our main objective is to have an elegant feel combined with a relaxed feeling. My husband always teases me in that I am always talking about a feeling……but I know our guests pay attention to their feelings during their stay and we strive to make every guest feel both relaxed and pampered during their stay at the Captain Freeman Inn.

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Since nature is a perfect place to relax, I often use color tones that are found in nature. I was intrigued when I found a shell that pulled together beautiful tones of blue, grey and tan. it would be fun to find a modern painting with these color tones as a base for decorating the room. The walls and fabric treatments could work around the painting…what fun! Can’t wait to decide which room I will be redecorating at the Captain Freeman Inn.

Farm to table with family in Virginia

by Donna Cain, innkeeper and owner

We just spent a couple of days visiting dear family in Richmond. We were greeted with a wonderful dinner at Byrons Aunt Jean’s house where we were able to meet all of the grand and great grand kids. What an incredible treat and blessing. There is something so endearing about southern hospitality. Life just seems to go at a slower pace and in this case, is all about family. I had  heard many stories about  Byron’s cousins, Jan and Alan, who had built a home in the country. Both had tired of Alan having to travel and being away from family so they decided to switch careers and build a family farm. Byron and I had talked about this many times and were anxious to see what country farming is all about.

I was especially excited as I believe and support the “farm to table” movement and strive to serve our family and guests fresh vegetables, herbs, eggs and meats whenever we can and the Captain Freeman Inn. I would also love to have a chicken coop one day at the inn where our guests could enjoy fresh eggs in the morning. Jan and I had the opportunity to talk, and she is a wealth of information about the affect of diet on ones health.

Before we toured the farm we visited in their large beautiful log cabin surrounded by family and a nice warm fire. Jan’s oldest daughter was visiting from Canada and they have three darling young children who were very happy to be spoiled by Grandma and Grandpa.

Since spring is the muddy season on the farm, Jan loaned me a pair of rubber boots so that we could see the entire farm. We left Harrison in the car as we did not want him to excite the chickens. We meandered down to their country store and saw Alan’s beautiful lake off to the left of the property. I was tickled to see a John Deer tractor….always thought they were kinda cool. (next time I’ll have to ask if I could have a short drive and maybe move some hay with it:))

First shot is of the family. Note the mobile chicken coup in the background that Alan is building. At first it seemed kinda crazy but once I stopped to think about it, it made perfect sense. Successful gardening is all about fertilizing the soil. (Nanna always told me that chicken manure is the best fertilizer to add to the garden soil) Alan will move the coup around their fields which has wire mesh on the bottom to allow the “bird poop” (excuse the graphics) to fall below. They have nesting boxes along the sides to pick up the eggs daily.

Farm helpers

Farm helpers

The chickens just looked so happy and were fenced in the orchard area where new pear, apple and peach trees were growing.

New chickens for fresh eggs

New chickens for fresh eggs

Jan holding one of their prized chickens

Jan holding one of their prized chickens

We were lucky enough to meet a new calf that was just born last week. The Mom’s name is Button, and they were looking for a new name for this cute little guy. This area is used for milking which they do once a day. I was interested in learning that the new breed of milking cows can now be milked once a day which is perfect for small gentlemen farms that may combine working a regular job with having a few animals at home to feed their families. I grew up in the Berkshires in dairy country and remember very well having to stop our car as the cows moved to and from the rolling country fields to the milking parlor twice a day. Having to do the milking once a day (by hand I might add) seemed like a huge advantage, especially on the cold winter days. They had 6-8 milking cows with two almost ready to give birth. They sell the delicious milk in the store. When we opened the frig in the store I saw 3 large bottles of milk with cream on the top with customer’s names on the top. These bottles are reused each time.

New calf.....name TBD

New calf…..name TBD

Mamma Button

Mamma Button

The rest of the milking herd

The rest of the milking herd

Chicken processing site:(

Chicken processing site:(

Now here is the picture Byron thought I should leave off….but hey this is a part of life. This is the chicken/turkey processing center. The farm sells fresh milk and cream, fresh eggs and fresh chicken meat and yes the poor chickens have to be killed so that humans can enjoy the fresh meat on their tables. State health code allows them to process the chicken meat but the cattle have to be processed by a licensed butcher.

Byron and Jan-  cousins

Byron and Jan- cousins

Frozen beef

Frozen beef

Byron is from Wyoming and always enjoys when we serve meat for dinner. When I looked in the store freezer I so wished we lived closer so that we could enjoy the benefits of grass fed beef from this farm.

2 blue birds pirched on top of the fence post

2 blue birds pirched on top of the fence post

The last part of our tour included a visit to Julie’s house (Jan’s sister) which is right next door. We could see the beef cattle grazing in the far field. I was tickled to see a wide variety of birds flying around and ecstatic when I saw a Bluebird pair pirched on a near bye fence post. They were my mother’s favorite bird, and I have always loved them too. This just made my day!

The farm also includes a large vegetable garden, blueberry and strawberry patch, all sold in the country store. Jan said it was fun in the summer to visit with some retired old time farmers that love to see what they are doing. They always love to share stories that are filled with good clues on how to make the farm run more smoothly. I am learning that our elders are always filled with good advise.

As we were walking back to the house Jan shared that when they started the farm they did not know a single thing about farming. They have just jumped in and learned along the way. I was so impressed. What a great way to tackle a new life adventure.

Oh I forgot to mention that their son also helps on the farm and has a bee hive. There was a mystery last year as all the of bees left the hive. That happened to many neighbors which is a concern. They were going to try again this spring and hopefully be able to sell the honey in the store.

Thanks Jan and Alan for sharing your farm with us. Just wished we lived closer to help out and to be able to benefit and enjoy all of your farm to table bounty.

So Byron, do you think we can build a chicken coop now at the Captain Freeman Inn?

A guest’s winter experience

By Donna Cain, Innkeeper and owner

Breakfast is one of my favorite times at the inn, and I always love to ask guests about their previous day’s experiences. This past weekend we had a lovely repeat guest stay with us that comes to Cape Cod to rest and rejuvenate. I so loved hearing about her adventures that I asked if I could mention some of her favorites in our blog. She was glad to share and actually e-mailed me one that she had forgotten to mention. Listed below are some of her favorites:

The Rose Dorothea Schooner Library in P”town-

Rose Dorothea Schooner Library

Rose Dorothea Schooner Library

For those that have never visited the library, it is a wonderful experience filled with a unique surprise- there is a replica boat in the middle of the building that is filled with history.

Rose Dorothea schooner

Rose Dorothea schooner

The Rose Dorothea won the “Lipton Cup”in a dramatic finish in 1907. The Lipton Cup was a special prize offered by Sir Thomas Lipton, who was an avid yachtsman, for the Fisherman’s Cup Race, a 42 mile race which took place in Massachusetts Bay, between Boston and Gloucester. The boat was an Indianhead schooner, designed by Tom McManus and built in 1905, at a cost of $15,000. In 1917 the schooner was sunk by German U-boat while traveling from Portugal to Saint John’s with a cargo of salt. Her crew escaped into dories and made it safely to Lisbon.
The boat that is found in the library is a half scale replica and was built as a tribute to Provincetown’s fishermen and New England ship building. Master ship builder Francis A. Flyer Santos oversaw construction, which started in 1977. The sails were hand sewn by Ernest W. Smith of New Bedford, one of the few men left who could create authentic sails for a Grand Banks Schooner. The Schooner sits on the second floor of the library with the sails high (the ceiling was modified to fit the tall masts) above which was originally the sanctuary of the Center Methodist Episcopal Church of Provincetown, built in 1860.

Wired Puppy , Specialty coffee and tea

Wired Puppy

Wired Puppy

We love coffee and tea and are anxious to try out this wonderful coffee shop. Our guest raved about the wonderful selection of teas ,and she chose the decaf jasmine green which is a loose tea option available at this eclectic house.

Napi’s restaurant, Provincetowns most unique restaurant-

Napi's restaurant

Napi’s restaurant

Our guest is vegetarian with some food allergies so we recommended  Napi’s. They have many vegetarian options and the menu is very eclectic and the clam chowder delicious!

Wellfleet Wildlife Sanctuary
Wellfleet Bay provides peace and unmatched beauty on the hillsides and shoreline overlooking Wellfleet Harbor. Extensive trails bring you to a panoramic salt marsh, sandy barrier beach, and pine woodlands, each attracting a wide array of wildlife. The sanctuary features a universally accessible trail and an award-winning “green” nature center with professional exhibits and aquariums. There is a $5 entrance fee to walk the trails which is worth every penny!

Brewster Fish House-

Bar at the Brewster Fish House

Bar at the Brewster Fish House

The Brewster Fish House is still our favorite restaurant on Cape Cod, simple, elegant dining that uses fresh local fish.

Harrison

Our lovable Harrison

Our lovable Harrison

Leslie loved Harrison, and she mentioned that spending time with him each morning had soothing affect on her soul and heart. We totally understand as our 4 legged friend loves us unconditionally.

White Cedar Swamp-

White Cedar Swamp

White Cedar Swamp

We found this wonderful walk trail last winter and have been recommending it to our guests ever since. The trail is found in the Marconi Beach area and includes a well maintained walk path and board walk through the swamp.

The Chocolate Sparrow-

The Chocolate Sparrow

The Chocolate Sparrow

We visit the Chocolate Sparrow frequently, and I love the Sparrow coffee which includes a chocolate flavoring. Our guest loved the atmosphere and was pleased when they accommodated her food allergies.

Last but not least our guest mentioned that she loved coming back to the Captain Freeman to rest by the fire in her room to read.

Truro fireplace

Truro fireplace

 We left her some gluten free cookies in her room to enjoy with a good cup of Harney and Son tea.

Thanks Leslie for staying with us and sharing all of your favorite spots.